Tom Avery (Explorer) Wiki, Biography, Age, Wife, Family, Net Worth

Tom Avery Wiki,Biography, Net Worth

Tom Avery is a British explorer, author and motivational speaker. He made record-breaking journeys to the South Pole in 2002 and to the North Pole in 2005. He is one of fewer than ten people throughout history to have completed the Polar Trilogy; full length expeditions to the South Pole and North Pole and a coast to coast crossing of Greenland. Avery and his teammates hold two Guinness World Records; the fastest surface journey to the North Pole and the fastest coast-to-coast crossing of Greenland. He is also the youngest Briton to have reached both the North and South Poles on foot.

Explore Tom Avery Wiki Age, Height, Biography as Wikipedia, Wife, Family relation. There is no question Tom Avery is the most famous & most loved celebrity of all the time. You can find out how much net worth Tom has this year and how he spent his expenses. Also find out how he got rich at the age of 45. He has a pure loving kind heart personality. Scroll Down and find everything about him.

Tom Avery Wiki, Biography

Date of Birth 17 December 1975
Birth Day 17 December
Birth Years 1975
Age 45 years old
Birth Place London, England
Birth City London
Birth Country United Kingdom
Nationality British
Famous As Explorer
Also Known for Explorer
Zodiac Sign Taurus
Occupation Explorer

Famously known by the Family name Tom Avery, is a great Explorer. He was born on 17 December 1975, in London, England

.London is a beautiful and populous city located in London, England

United Kingdom.

Tom Avery Early Life Story, Family Background and Education

Tom Avery was born to Julian and Quenelda Avery in London, England and educated at Vinehall School in East Sussex. and Harrow School in North London. Due to his father’s occupation, he frequently travelled with his family between Sussex, Brazil and France. When Tom was seven years old, his mother gave him a book about the adventures of Captain Robert Falcon Scott. As he later wrote in his book, To The End of the Earth (2009), he was captivated by Scott’s heroic story and knew he wanted to go to Antarctica, and ultimately the South Pole.

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Tom Avery Net Worth

Tom Avery has a net worth of $5.00 million (Estimated) which he earned from his occupation as Explorer. Popularly known as the Explorer of United Kingdom. He is seen as one of the most successful Explorer of all times. Tom Avery Net Worth & Basic source of earning is being a successful British Explorer.

Tom entered the career as Explorer In his early life after completing his formal education..

Net Worth

Estimated Net Worth in 2022 $1 Million to $5 Million Approx
Previous Year’s Net Worth (2021) Being Updated
Salary in 2021 Not Available
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Tom Avery Personal Life, Relationships and Dating

Avery lives in the Cotswolds with his wife Mary and their three daughters. Along with Welsh rugby player Jonathan Davies, Avery was part of the winning team in the 2004 TAG Heuer Link Challenge celebrity golf event at Sunningdale Golf Club and in 2008 he played in the Alfred Dunhill Links pro-am Championships in St Andrews.

In 2005, Avery partnered record-breaking ocean sailor Dame Ellen Macarthur in the Round the Island Yacht Race aboard the 75-foot trimaran B&Q round the Isle of Wight, finishing sixth out of 1,300 boats. They raced together again in the 2008 Cowes Week yachting regatta aboard an Extreme 40 catamaran.

Tom Avery’s official Twitter account

The Explorer with a large number of Twitter followers, with whom he shares his life experiences. Tom is gaining More popularity of his Profession on Twitter these days. You can read today’s latest tweets and post from Tom Avery’s official Twitter account below, where you can know what he is saying in his previous tweet. Read top and most recent tweets from his Twitter account here…

https://twitter.com/tomavery?lang=en

Social Network

Born on 17 December 1975, the Explorer Tom Avery is arguably the world’s most influential social media star. Tom is an ideal celebrity influencer. With his large number of social media fans, he often posts many personal photos and videos to interact with his huge fan base on social media platforms. Personal touch and engage with his followers. You can scroll down for information about his Social media profiles.

Social Media Profiles and Accounts

Twitter Tom Avery Official Twitter
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Life Story & Timeline

2019

Following a training expedition to New Zealand’s Southern Alps, Avery, Paul Landry, Andrew Gerber and Patrick Woodhead flew to Antarctica in early November 2002, beginning their 700-mile (1,135 km) expedition from Hercules Inlet.

In recognition of the Expedition’s accomplishments, Avery was presented with the Royal Institute of Navigation’s Certificate of Achievement by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh at a ceremony at the Royal Geographical Society.

Commenting on Avery’s achievement, the expedition patron, Prince Charles said; “This country’s tradition of producing refreshingly eccentric adventurers is very much alive.”

2015

In 2015, Avery announced that he was setting out to complete the final leg of the Polar Trilogy by making a coast-to-coast crossing of Greenland, and to do so in a record time.  Whilst there had been faster crossings of Greenland’s interior ice sheet, the fastest time for a full coast-to-coast traverse of Greenland stood at 17 days and 20 hours, set in 2008.

2009

Tom Avery was born to Julian and Quenelda Avery in London, England and educated at Vinehall School in East Sussex. and Harrow School in North London. Due to his father’s occupation, he frequently travelled with his family between Sussex, Brazil and France. When Tom was seven years old, his mother gave him a book about the adventures of Captain Robert Falcon Scott. As he later wrote in his book, To The End of the Earth (2009), he was captivated by Scott’s heroic story and knew he wanted to go to Antarctica, and ultimately the South Pole.

Avery recounted his experience in his 2009 book, To The End of the Earth: The Race to Solve Polar Exploration’s Greatest Mystery, which was published on both sides of the Atlantic.

To mark the centenary of Peary’s expedition, Avery organized a ceremony at Peary and Henson’s grave sites at Arlington National Cemetery at 11am on April 2009, exactly 100 years after they claimed to have reached the North Pole. More than 20 members of Peary’s and Henson’s extended families, Avery’s North Pole team and other dignitaries attended the ceremony, which also included a Colour Guard and Military Band.

In 2009, alongside Bear Grylls and Ben Fogle, Avery was shortlisted to the final three candidates for the post of Chief Scout, missing out to Grylls in the final selection.

2008

In 2008 Avery designed a mountain journal in conjunction with Smythson of Bond Street.

2007

In 2007, Avery returned to the Canadian Arctic to help train Richard Hammond to drive dog teams in preparation for Top Gear’s Polar Special. Whilst waiting for co-presenters Jeremy Clarkson and James May to arrive for filming, Avery and Hammond drove the programme’s two Toyota Hilux trucks to the summit of Signal Hill, overlooking the expedition’s base camp at Resolute Bay.

2006

In 2006, Avery led the first British team ever to complete the Patrouille des Glaciers, the largest ski mountaineering race in the World, involving 4,000 metres of both ascent and descent over 53 km of glaciated terrain between Zermatt and Verbier.

Alongside fellow explorer Sir Ranulph Fiennes and rugby union player and coach Dean Richards, Avery led 200 members of the public on the 2006 Talisker Trek on the Isle of Skye. Avery led the 2007 Talisker Trek with endurance swimmer Lewis Pugh and rugby union player and broadcaster Martin Bayfield. The treks raised enough funds for The Woodland Trust to plant more than 500,000 trees.

2005

In 2005 Avery, along with teammates Matty McNair, Andrew Gerber, George Wells and Hugh Dale-Harris recreated Robert Peary and Matthew Henson’s 1909 controversial expedition to the North Pole. His goal of the expedition was to assess whether Peary had achieved what he claimed.

They made steady progress for the first half of the crossing, before strong winds enabled them to kite 180 miles (290 km) to the western edge of the ice cap in a single 16-hour push.  During one 10-minute period, their GPS data recorded an average speed of 23.4 knots (43.3kmh).  Temperatures were unseasonably cold for the time of year, and Wells suffered frostbitten toes, seven of which had to be amputated on their return to the UK.  The team (including Wells) descended the Russell Glacier and continued on to the ocean at the head of Kangerlussuaq Fjord, completing the crossing on May 17, 2005 in new record time of 9 days, 19 hours and 40 minutes, 8 days quicker than the previous crossing.

In 2005, Avery partnered record-breaking ocean sailor Dame Ellen MacArthur in the Round the Island Yacht Race aboard the 75-foot trimaran B&Q round the Isle of Wight, finishing sixth out of 1,300 boats. They raced together again in the 2008 Cowes Week yachting regatta aboard an Extreme 40 catamaran.

In 2005 Avery was already supporting London’s bid to host the 2012 Olympics and carried its standard as official ambassador in his team’s record-breaking trip to the North Pole. He carried a London 2012 campaign flag and planted it at the Pole.

2003

In 2003, Avery starred in Mercedes Benz’ “Some People are Better at Movement than Others” TV advertising campaign. Filmed in a blizzard in the Pyrenees, Avery’s scene sees him playing chess in an M-Class.

2002

In 2002, Avery at age 27 became the youngest Briton ever to ski to the South Pole. The Commonwealth South Pole Centenary Expedition was the ninth major expedition that he had organised and was the culmination of two years’ planning.

On 28 December 2002, 45 days and 6 hours later, Avery’s team completed the journey to the South Pole. They broke the British South Pole speed record by using kites to power them across the ice, much like the modern sport of kitesurfing. They covered the last 47 miles (76 km) to the Pole in a marathon final 31 hours of continuous manhauling.

Based largely on his Antarctic journal, Avery published Pole Dance as his first book. Written in diary form, it details the 2002 South Pole expedition. The book’s title is a nod to a chance meeting with the nightclub owner Peter Stringfellow on an aeroplane, who promised to introduce Avery to his publisher on the condition that Avery launch the book at his table-dancing club in Covent Garden.

2000

In 2000 he led a British mountaineering expedition to the remote Trans-Alay Mountains Mountains in Kyrgyzstan. The team scaled a total of nine previously unclimbed and unnamed summits including the 5,439m Pik Quenelda (named after Avery’s mother) and the 5,440m Golova Orla (Eagle’s Head in English). The team also named one of their summits Pik Fiennes (5,001m), after the expedition patron, Sir Ranulph Fiennes.

In 2000 Avery completed the Haute Route alpine traverse on skis, and in 2002, whilst training for the South Pole, he and his teammates made the first ski descent of the western (Melchior) breach of the Franz Josef Glacier in New Zealand’s, Southern Alps, naming the route Sandfly.

1998

At university, he organised and led mountaineering expeditions to the Andes, New Zealand, the Alps, Tanzania, Patagonia and Morocco. After graduating in 1998 with a BSc in Geography and Geology from the University of Bristol, he began a temporary 15-month career as an accountant with Arthur Andersen.

1997

Avery also made attempts on Artesonraju in Peru in 1997 (the mountain in the Paramount Pictures logo), Aconcagua in Argentina in 1998 and Cho Oyu in September 2006, when alongside teammate Kenton Cool he was aiming to be the first Briton to ski down an 8,000-metre peak. Avery was forced to turn back at approximately 6,500 metres after suffering a retinal hemorrhage, whilst Cool went on to summit and ski back down.

1995

Avery lives in the Cotswolds with his wife Mary and their three daughters. Avery’s other interests include skiing, ocean sailing and golf.  His ultimate ambition is to sail around the world. In 1995 Avery crewed on an Oyster HP53 sailing yacht from New Zealand to Tonga and then across the Indian Ocean from Bali, via the Chagos Islands to the Seychelles in 1996. He ran the 1997 London Marathon in under 4 hours. Along with Welsh rugby player Jonathan Davies, Avery was part of the winning team in the 2004 TAG Heuer Link Challenge celebrity golf event at Sunningdale Golf Club and in 2008 he played in the Alfred Dunhill Links pro-am Championships in St Andrews.

1975

Thomas (Tom) Avery, FRGS (born 17 December 1975) is a British explorer, author and motivational speaker. He made record-breaking journeys to the South Pole in 2002 and to the North Pole in 2005. He is one of fewer than ten people throughout history to have completed the Polar Trilogy; full length expeditions to the South Pole and North Pole and a coast to coast crossing of Greenland. Avery and his teammates hold two Guinness World Records; the fastest surface journey to the North Pole and the fastest coast-to-coast crossing of Greenland. He is also the youngest Briton to have reached both the North and South Poles on foot.

1969

However, in his book, Avery argued that Herbert could not be deemed an impartial adjudicator, because by renouncing Peary’s claim, that would then crown Herbert himself (who drove dog teams to the Pole in 1969) as the first person to reach the North Pole on foot.

1909

Avery’s party reached the Pole in a faster time that any expedition had managed since 1909. They used the same equipment available to Peary and Henson for their 1909 expedition, and their sled weights were broadly the same.

Travelling with Canadian Eskimo Dog teams and replicas of Peary’s own wooden sledges, Avery’s team set out from Peary’s original Base Camp at Cape Columbia on Ellesmere Island. Shortly before their departure from Cape Columbia, Avery and his team discovered original relics and tools from the 1909 mission.

The Avery team’s speediest distance over 5 marches was 90 nautical miles, significantly short of the 135 claimed by Peary in his 5-march dash to the Pole in 1909. However, Peary was travelling for up to 20 hours a day, his significantly larger team enabled him to save the fittest dogs for the final polar dash and the ice pack of 1909 was dominated by thicker and more stable multi-year ice, which provided a generally smoother and therefore quicker surface to travel across.

Based on this expedition, Avery argues in his book that Peary did reach the North Pole in 1909. Wally Herbert, a polar explorer, was earlier commissioned by the National Geographic Society to assess Peary’s records, and gave him access to his original diary and astronomical observations. Based on Herbert’s published conclusions in 1989, it is widely held that Peary did not reach the Pole, although he was likely within five miles.

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