Lu Lingzi Wiki, Biography, Age, Wife, Family, Net Worth

Lu Lingzi Wiki,Biography, Net Worth

Explore Boston Marathon bombing Wiki Age, Height, Biography as Wikipedia, Wife, Family relation. There is no question Boston Marathon bombing is the most famous & most loved celebrity of all the time. You can find out how much net worth Boston Marathon has this year and how he spent his expenses. Also find out how he got rich at the age of 24. He has a pure loving kind heart personality. Scroll Down and find everything about him.

Lu Lingzi Wiki, Biography

Date of Birth
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Birth Years
Age 24 years old
Birth Place Russia
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Birth Country Russia
Nationality Russian
Famous As deadly explosions during the 2013 Boston Marathon, and subsequent shooting and manhunt
Also Known for deadly explosions during the 2013 Boston Marathon, and subsequent shooting and manhunt
Zodiac Sign Gemini
Occupation deadly explosions during the 2013 Boston Marathon, and subsequent shooting and manhunt

Famously known by the Family name Boston Marathon bombing, is a great deadly explosions during the 2013 Boston Marathon, and subsequent shooting and manhunt. He was born on , in Russia

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Boston Marathon bombing Net Worth

Boston Marathon bombing has a net worth of $5.00 million (Estimated) which he earned from his occupation as deadly explosions during the 2013 Boston Marathon, and subsequent shooting and manhunt. Popularly known as the deadly explosions during the 2013 Boston Marathon, and subsequent shooting and manhunt of Russia. He is seen as one of the most successful deadly explosions during the 2013 Boston Marathon, and subsequent shooting and manhunt of all times. Boston Marathon bombing Net Worth & Basic source of earning is being a successful Russian deadly explosions during the 2013 Boston Marathon, and subsequent shooting and manhunt.

Boston Marathon entered the career as deadly explosions during the 2013 Boston Marathon, and subsequent shooting and manhunt In his early life after completing his formal education..

Net Worth

Estimated Net Worth in 2022 $1 Million to $5 Million Approx
Previous Year’s Net Worth (2021) Being Updated
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Income Source deadly explosions during the 2013 Boston Marathon, and subsequent shooting and manhunt

Social Network

Born on , the deadly explosions during the 2013 Boston Marathon, and subsequent shooting and manhunt Boston Marathon bombing is arguably the world’s most influential social media star. Boston Marathon is an ideal celebrity influencer. With his large number of social media fans, he often posts many personal photos and videos to interact with his huge fan base on social media platforms. Personal touch and engage with his followers. You can scroll down for information about his Social media profiles.

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Life Story & Timeline

2019

A monument memorializing the victims was completed at the bombing site on August 19, 2019.

2018

Tsarnaev was found guilty on all 30 counts on April 8. The sentencing phase of the trial began April 21, and a further verdict was reached on May 15 recommending that he be put to death. Tsarnaev was sentenced to death on June 24, after apologizing to the victims. In 2018 Tsarnaev’s lawyers appealed on the grounds that a lower-court judge’s refusal to move the case to another city not traumatized by the bombings deprived him of a fair trial.

Phillipos was released from prison in Philadelphia on February 26, 2018 and must serve a three year probation upon his release.

2017

Phillipos faced a maximum sentence of eight years’ imprisonment on each count. In June 2015, U.S. District Judge Douglas P. Woodlock sentenced him to three years in prison. Phillipos filed an appeal, but his sentence was upheld in court on February 28, 2017.

2016

A film about the Boston Marathon bombing and subsequent manhunt, Patriots Day, was released in December 2016. Another film, Stronger, which chronicles survivor Jeff Bauman, was released in September 2017.

2015

During questioning, Dzhokhar said that he and his brother were motivated by extremist Islamist beliefs and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, that they were self-radicalized and unconnected to any outside terrorist groups, and that he was following his brother’s lead. He said they learned to build explosive devices from the online magazine of Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. He also said they had intended to travel to New York City to bomb Times Square. On April 8, 2015, he was convicted of 30 charges, including use of a weapon of mass destruction and malicious destruction of property resulting in death. Two months later, he was sentenced to death.

Jury selection began on January 5, 2015 and was completed on March 3, with a jury consisting of eight men and ten women (including six alternates). The trial began on March 4 with Assistant U.S. Attorney William Weinreb describing the bombing and painting Dzhokhar as “a soldier in a holy war against Americans” whose motive was “reaching paradise”. He called the brothers equal participants.

Tazhayakov pleaded not guilty and went to trial, arguing that “Kadyrbayev was the mastermind behind destroying the evidence and that Tazhayakov only ‘attempted obstruction.'” Jurors returned a guilty verdict against him, however, and he was sentenced to 42 months in prison in June 2015, which equated to three and a half years. Judge Douglas Woodlock gave a lighter sentence to Tazahayakov than to Kadyrbayev, who was viewed as more culpable. Tazhayakov was released in May 2016 and subsequently deported.

In March 2015, Matanov pleaded guilty to all four counts. In June 2015, he was sentenced to 30 months in prison.

Boston University established a scholarship in honor of Lü Lingzi, a student who died in the bombing. University of Massachusetts Boston did the same in honor of alumna and bombing victim Krystle Campell. MIT also established a scholarship and erected a sculpture (unveiled on April 29, 2015), both in memory of MIT Police officer Sean Collier.

2014

Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Police Officer Richard H. Donohue Jr. was also critically wounded by friendly fire from officers who shot at the fleeing vehicle, but survived. Boston Police Department officer Dennis Simmonds was injured by a hand grenade and died April 10, 2014. Fifteen other officers were also injured. A later report by Harvard Kennedy School’s Program on Crisis Leadership concluded that lack of coordination among police agencies had put the public at excessive risk during the shootout.

Kadyrbayev pleaded guilty to obstruction charges on August 22, 2014, but sentencing was delayed pending the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Yates v. United States. Kadyrbayev was sentenced to six years in prison in June 2015. He was deported back to Kazakhstan in October 2018.

Phillipos was arrested and faced charges of knowingly making false statements to police. He was released on $100,000 bail and placed under house confinement with an ankle monitor. He was convicted on October 28, 2014, on two charges of lying about being in Tsarnaev’s dorm room. He later acknowledged that he had been in the room while two friends removed a backpack containing potential evidence relating to the bombing.

A federal indictment was unsealed against Khairullozhon Matanov on May 30, 2014, charging him with “one count of destroying, altering, and falsifying records, documents, and tangible objects in a federal investigation, specifically information on his computer, and three counts of making materially false, fictitious, and fraudulent statements in a federal terrorism investigation.” Matanov bought dinner for the two Tsarnaev brothers 40 minutes after the bombing. After the Tsarnaev brothers’ photos were released to the public, Matanov viewed the photos on the CNN and FBI websites before attempting to reach Dzhokhar, and then tried to give away his cell phone and delete hundreds of documents from his computer. Prosecutors said that Matanov attempted to mislead investigators about the nature of his relationship with the brothers and to conceal that he shared their philosophy of violence.

Boston Police Department officer Dennis Simmonds died on April 10, 2014 from hand-grenade injuries received during the Watertown shootout a year before.

The Russian government said special attention would be paid to security at upcoming international sports events in Russia, including the 2014 Winter Olympics. According to the Russian embassy in the U.S., President Vladimir Putin condemned the bombing as a “barbaric crime” and “stressed that the Russian Federation will be ready, if necessary, to assist in the U.S. authorities’ investigation.” He urged closer cooperation of security services with Western partners but other Russian authorities and mass media blamed the U.S. authorities for negligence as they warned the U.S. of the Tsarnaevs. Moreover Russian authorities and mass media since the spring of 2014 blame the United States for politically motivated false information about the lack of response from Russian authorities after subsequent U.S. requests. As proof a letter from the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB) was shown to the members of an official U.S. Congressional delegation to Moscow during their visit. This letter with information about Tsarnaev (including his biography details, connections and phone number) had been sent from the FSB to the FBI and CIA during March 2011.

2013

During the annual Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013, two homemade pressure cooker bombs detonated 14 seconds and 210 yards (190 m) apart at 2:49  p.m., near the finish line of the race, killing 3 people and injuring several hundred others, including 17 who lost limbs.

The 117th annual Boston Marathon was run on Patriots’ Day, April 15, 2013. At 2:49  p.m. EDT (18:49 UTC) , two bombs detonated about 210 yards (190 m) apart at the finish line on Boylston Street near Copley Square. The first exploded outside Marathon Sports at 671–673 Boylston Street at 2:49:43  p.m. At the time of the first explosion, the race clock at the finish line showed 04:09:43 – the elapsed time since the Wave 3 start at 10:40  a.m. The second bomb exploded at 2:49:57  p.m., 14 seconds later and one block farther west at 755 Boylston Street. The explosions took place nearly three hours after the winning runner crossed the finish line, but with more than 5,700 runners yet to finish.

On April 22, 2013, formal criminal charges were brought against Tsarnaev in the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts during a bedside hearing while he was hospitalized. He was charged with use of a weapon of mass destruction and with malicious destruction of property resulting in death. Some of the charges carry potential sentences of life imprisonment or the death penalty. Tsarnaev was judged to be awake, mentally competent, and lucid, and he responded to most questions by nodding. The judge asked him whether he was able to afford an attorney and he said no; he was represented by the Federal Public Defender’s office. On April 26, Dzhohkar Tsarnaev was moved from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center to the Federal Medical Center at Fort Devens, about 40 miles (64 km) from Boston. FMC Devens is a federal prison medical facility at a former Army base where he was held in solitary confinement at a segregated housing unit with 23-hour-per-day lockdown.

On July 10, 2013, Tsarnaev pleaded not guilty to 30 charges in his first public court appearance, including a murder charge for MIT police officer Sean Collier. He was back in court for a status hearing on September 23, and his lawyers requested more time to prepare their defense. On October 2, Tsarnaev’s attorneys asked the court to lift the special administrative measures (SAMs) imposed by Attorney General Holder in August, saying that the measures had left Tsarnaev unduly isolated from communication with his family and lawyers, and that no evidence suggested that he posed a future threat.

Kadyrbayev and Tazhayakov were arrested by police at the off-campus housing complex during the night of April 18–19. An unidentified girlfriend of one of the men was also arrested, but all three were soon released.

Kadyrbayev and Tazhayakov were indicted by a federal grand jury on August 8, 2013 on charges of conspiracy to obstruct justice for helping Dzhokhar Tsarnaev dispose of a laptop computer, fireworks, and a backpack after the bombing. Each faced up to 25 years in prison and deportation if convicted. Tazhayakov was convicted of obstruction of justice and conspiracy on July 21, 2014.

Marc Fucarile lost his right leg and received severe burns and shrapnel wounds. He was the last victim released from hospital care on July 24, 2013.

The One Fund Boston was established by Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick and Boston mayor Thomas Menino to make monetary distributions to bombing victims. The Boston Strong concert at the TD Garden in Boston on May 30, 2013 benefitted the One Fund, which ultimately received more than $69.8 million in donations. A week after the bombing, crowd funding websites received more than 23,000 pledges promising more than $2 million for the victims, their families, and others affected by the bombing. The Israel Trauma Coalition for Response and Preparedness sent six psychologists and specialists from Israel to help Boston emergency responders, government administrators, and community people develop post-terrorist attack recovery strategies.

President Barack Obama addressed the nation after the attack. He said that the perpetrators were still unknown, but that the government would “get to the bottom of this” and that those responsible “will feel the full weight of justice”. He ordered flags to half-staff until April 20 on all federal buildings as “a mark of respect for the victims of the senseless acts of violence perpetrated on April 15, 2013 in Boston, Massachusetts.”

Organizers of the 2013 Vancouver Sun Run, which was held on April 21, 2013, donated $10 from every late entry for the race to help victims of the bombing at the Boston Marathon. Jamie Pitblado, vice-president of promotions for The Vancouver Sun and The Province, said the money would go to One Fund Boston, an official charity that collected donations for the victims and their families. Sun Run organizers raised anywhere from $25,000 to $40,000. There were over 48,000 participants, many dressed in blue and yellow (Boston colors) with others wearing Boston Red Sox caps.

Petr Gandalovic, ambassador of the Czech Republic, released a statement after noticing much confusion on Facebook and Twitter between his nation and the Chechen Republic. “The Czech Republic and Chechnya are two very different entities – the Czech Republic is a Central European country; Chechnya is a part of the Russian Federation.”

On April 19, 2013, the press-secretary of the head of the Chechen Republic, Ramzan Kadyrov, issued a statement that, inter alia, read: “The Boston bombing suspects have nothing to do with Chechnya”. On the same day, Kadyrov was reported by The Guardian to have written on Instagram:

2012

At the time of the bombing, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was a student at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth with a major in marine biology. He became a naturalized U.S. citizen on September 11, 2012. Tamerlan’s boxing coach reported to NBC that the young brother was greatly affected by Tamerlan and admired him.

The Mujahideen of the Caucasus Emirate Province of Dagestan, the Caucasian Islamist organization in both Chechnya and Dagestan, denied any link to the bombing or the Tsarnaev brothers and stated that it was at war with Russia, not the United States. It also said that it had sworn off violence against civilians since 2012.

2011

After being identified, the father of the two suspects claimed that the FBI had been watching his family, and that they visited his sons’ home in Cambridge, Massachusetts five times, most recently in 2011, as “preventive work… afraid there might be some explosions on the streets of Boston.”

Tamerlan was previously connected to the triple homicide in Waltham, Massachusetts, on the evening of September 11, 2011, but he was not a suspect at the time. Brendan Mess, Erik Weissman, and Raphael Teken were murdered in Mess’s apartment. All had their throats slit from ear to ear with such great force that they were nearly decapitated. The local district attorney said that it appeared that the killer and the victims knew each other, and that the murders were not random. Tamerlan Tsarnaev had previously described murder victim Brendan Mess as his “best friend.” After the bombing and subsequent revelations of Tsarnaev’s personal life, the Waltham murders case was reexamined in April 2013 with Tsarnaev as a new suspect. Both ABC and The New York Times have reported that there is strong evidence which implicates Tsarnaev in this triple homicide.

Robel Phillipos (19) was a U.S. citizen of Ethiopian descent living in Cambridge who was arrested and faced with charges of knowingly making false statements to police. He graduated from high school in 2011 with Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Dias Kadyrbayev (19) and Azamat Tazhayakov (20) were natives of Kazakhstan living in the U.S. They were Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s roommates in an off-campus housing complex in New Bedford, Massachusetts at which Tsarnaev had sometimes stayed.

Phillipos, Kadyrbayev, Tazhayakov, and Tsarnaev entered the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth in the fall of 2011 and knew each other well. After seeing photos of Tsarnaev on television, the three men traveled to his dorm room where they retrieved a backpack and laptop belonging to Tsarnaev. The backpack was discarded, but police recovered it and its contents in a nearby New Bedford landfill on April 26. During interviews, the men initially denied visiting the dorm room but later admitted their actions.

Republican U.S. Senators Saxby Chambliss and Richard Burr reported that Russian authorities had separately asked both the FBI (at least twice: during March and November 2011) and the CIA (September 2011) to look carefully into Tamerlan Tsarnaev and provide more information about him back to Russia. Russian Federal Security Service (FSB) secretly recorded phone conversations between Tamerlan Tsarnaev and his mother (they vaguely and indirectly discussed jihad) and sent these to the FBI as evidence of possible extremist links within the family. However, while Russia offered US intelligence services warnings that Tsarnaev planned to link up with extremist groups abroad, an FBI investigation yielded no evidence to support those claims at the time. In addition, subsequent U.S. requests for additional information about Tsarnaev went unanswered by the Russians.

2010

The Tsarnaev family immigrated to the United States in 2002 where they applied for political asylum, settling in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Tamerlan Tsarnaev attended Bunker Hill Community College but dropped out to become a boxer. His goal was to gain a place on the U.S. Olympic boxing team, saying that, “unless his native Chechnya becomes independent”, he would “rather compete for the United States than for Russia”. He married U.S. citizen Katherine Russell on July 15, 2010 in the Masjid Al Quran Mosque. While initially quoted in a student magazine as saying, “I don’t have a single American friend. I don’t understand them,” a later FBI interview report documents Tamerlan stating it was a misquote, and that most of his friends were American. He had a history of violence, including an arrest in July 2009 for assaulting his girlfriend.

Matanov was originally from Kyrgyzstan. He came to the U.S. in 2010 on a student visa, and later claimed asylum. He attended Quincy College for two years before dropping out to become a taxicab driver. He was living in Quincy, Massachusetts, at the time of his arrest, and was a friend of Tamerlan Tsarnaev.

2009

The brothers were Muslim; Tamerlan’s aunt stated that he had recently become a devout Muslim. Tamerlan became more devout and religious after 2009, and a YouTube channel in his name linked to Salafist and Islamist videos. The FBI was informed by the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB) in 2011 that he was a “follower of radical Islam.” In response, the FBI interviewed Tamerlan and his family and searched databases, but they did not find any evidence of “terrorism activity, domestic or foreign.” During the 2012 trip to Dagestan, Tamerlan was reportedly a frequent visitor at a mosque on Kotrova Street in Makhachkala, believed by the FSB to be linked with radical Islam. Some believe that “they were motivated by their faith, apparently an anti-American, radical version of Islam” acquired in the U.S., while others believe that the turn happened in Dagestan.

2006

Sean A. Collier, 27 years old, was ambushed by the bombers as he sat in his police car on April 18, at about 10:48  p.m. He was an MIT police officer, and had been with the Somerville Auxiliary Police Department from 2006 to 2009. He died from multiple gunshot wounds.

2002

Records on the Honda left at the scene identified the men as two brothers whose family had immigrated to the United States seeking political asylum around 2002: 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev and 19-year-old Dzhokhar “Jahar” Tsarnaev. The FBI released additional photos of the two during the Watertown incident. Early on April 19, Watertown residents received automated calls asking them to stay indoors. That same morning Governor Patrick asked residents of Watertown and adjacent cities and towns to “shelter in place”. Somerville residents also received automated calls instructing them to shelter in place.

1986

Tamerlan Tsarnaev was born in 1986 in the Kalmyk Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic, North Caucasus. Dzhokhar was born in 1993 in Kazakhstan, although some reports say that his family claims that he was born in Dagestan. The family spent time in Almaty, Kazakhstan, and in Makhachkala, Dagestan. They are half Chechen through their father Anzor, and half Avar through their mother Zubeidat. They never lived in Chechnya, yet the brothers identified themselves as Chechen.