Guy Richards Smit (Artist) Wiki, Biography, Age, Wife, Family, Net Worth

Guy Richards Smit Wiki,Biography, Net Worth

Guy Richards Smit is an American performance artist, painter, and singer-songwriter in the band Maxi Geil! & PlayColt. He has shown at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, also in London, Los Angeles, Madrid, Valencia, Paris, Dublin, and Havana, among other places. He is represented by Charlie James Gallery in Los Angeles.

Explore Guy Richards Smit Wiki Age, Height, Biography as Wikipedia, Wife, Family relation. There is no question Guy Richards Smit is the most famous & most loved celebrity of all the time. You can find out how much net worth Guy Richards has this year and how he spent his expenses. Also find out how he got rich at the age of 51. He has a pure loving kind heart personality. Scroll Down and find everything about him.

Guy Richards Smit Wiki, Biography

Date of Birth 1970
Birth Day October 2
Birth Years 1970
Age 51 years old
Birth Place United States of America
Birth City
Birth Country United States of America
Nationality American
Famous As Painter
Also Known for Painter
Zodiac Sign Libra
Occupation Painter

Famously known by the Family name Guy Richards Smit, is a great Painter. He was born on 1970, in United States of America

Guy Richards Smit Early Life Story, Family Background and Education

As a Manhattan teen, Smit was in a number of Alternative rock bands. He studied abroad for a year at the Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam as an undergraduate at Parsons, and lived for a year in Berlin. He then entered the Master of Fine Arts program at Rutgers where he learned of the work of New York performance artist Michael Smith. He described to Vice magazine encountering Smith’s video, Go for It, Mike, that he felt it was “the saddest, most amazing celebration of averageness that’s ever been made. I saw that and realized this is what I want to do.” Smit graduated in 1996.

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Guy Richards Smit Net Worth

Guy Richards Smit has a net worth of $5.00 million (Estimated) which he earned from his occupation as Painter. Popularly known as the Painter of United States of America. He is seen as one of the most successful Painter of all times. Guy Richards Smit Net Worth & Basic source of earning is being a successful American Painter.

Guy Richards entered the career as Painter In his early life after completing his formal education..

Net Worth

Estimated Net Worth in 2022 $1 Million to $5 Million Approx
Previous Year’s Net Worth (2021) Being Updated
Salary in 2021 Not Available
Annual Salary Being Updated
Cars Info Not Available
Income Source Painter

Guy Richards Smit Personal Life, Relationships and Dating

He is married to Rebecca Chamberlain, a visual artist and member of Max Geil! & PlayColt. They have two sons.

Social Network

Born on 1970, the Painter Guy Richards Smit is arguably the world’s most influential social media star. Guy Richards is an ideal celebrity influencer. With his large number of social media fans, he often posts many personal photos and videos to interact with his huge fan base on social media platforms. Personal touch and engage with his followers. You can scroll down for information about his Social media profiles.

Social Media Profiles and Accounts

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Life Story & Timeline

2014

Gopnik of The Washington Post wrote, “The confusion between the roles of Smit and Geil—and between Geil [as] rock star and director, and Geil, the … fictional porn king—make the artwork appealingly complex. It’s as though Smit takes the premise of a mockumentary such as This is Spinal Tap, then gives it the density and even subtle conherence of good contemporary art.” The writer also notes that the work leads to other questions. “The ambition that made Geil a star… also leads him into making work that pushes him beyond where his true talent lies. So should Geil stick with what he’s good at, however modest it turns out to be, or try his hand at stuff that may turn out to be absurd musical pornography? Which is better, satisfying competence or interesting incoherence, even failure?” Art critic John Haber wrote that he found the work “less pretentious than a Matthew Barney epic cycle” and “more coherent.”

2013

In 2013, Grossmalerman started an opinion column in ArtReview. In one he complains about the criticism he received during his time on an art panel with Christian Viveros-Fauné playing himself. The next month, he announces that his interest in trading up in representation to Hauser & Wirth, comparing himself to oligarchic and banker-collectors.

Simultaneously in 2013, Grossmalerman wrote a column for the art and culture website Hyperallergic.com. The first was an explicit call for an intern: “If you need a shoulder to cry on, cry on mine…. Your twenties are a tough time and I’m happy to hold you and to stroke your luminous golden locks. I mean, if you’re into that. No pressure.” Another tells a tale of being tasered and kidnapped at the Armory Show, and in another entry, he describes falling in love with his gallery’s assistant, his fifth such experience.

2008

In 2008, Smit started to put Grossmalerman into comic book form, where he saw wider narrative possibility: Smit majored in illustration while at Parsons and has told ArtNews, “If you were to shoot [dismemberment], you’d have to do all kinds of angles. But in a comic, these types of exaggerated happenings can be worked into a story far more easily. It was a chance to develop this character even more.” The second issue, published in 2011, featured Grossmalerman being kidnapped and stabbed in a group therapy session.

2007

In 2007, he painted a series of made-up newspapers headlines and photos. Headlines such as “U.S. Troops Pledge Loyalty to Maktada al-Sadr” were by turns satirical and like “Who Shall Be the Helen of My Tragedy?” by turns plaintive. The series continues into the present, with headlines referencing the 2016 presidential candidates and the spate of police brutality in the U.S., and is entitled NY Times.

2005

From 2005 to 2009, Smit was represented by Fred (London) Ltd. gallery in London.

2004

The band includes his wife Rebecca Chamberlain, also on vocals, John Allen on lead guitar, and Mark Ephraim on rhythm guitar and others. With songs with titles like “I Will Leave You First” and “Making Love in the Sunshine,” the group’s music has been described as “anti-sentimental.” In the latter song, for example, the band “request[s] your presence in the bathroom / When the music stops,” and in “The Artist’s Lament,” Maxi croons “I want your vagina around the head of my prick.” The band themselves describe themselves as “French pop / German pop / Italian pop” and have played in New York City and London, and released two albums. A Message To My Audience, their first full-length effort in 2004 in which the TV actress Zoe Lister-Jones (now known for her work on Whitney) appeared, as well as half-brother Tijn Smit, who played keyboard on the song, “Here Comes Maxi.” The band released their second album, Strange Sensation, in 2007.

The work, funded by Roebling Hall and the Indiana Museum of Contemporary Art in Indianapolis, debuted at MoMA during its fall 2004 reopening. Maxi Geil! & PlayColt also played at the event.

1999

His Dutch father, J. W. Smit, was a Dutch language and literature professor at Columbia University and an expert on French composer Hector Berlioz. His Dutch-American mother, Pamela Richards, was a professor of library history. (She died in 1999, and his father in 2006.) Smit’s sister, Marijke, is an urban planner who works with a green architectural firm in the Bay Area. His two older half-brothers (from his father’s first marriage) are both in creative fields in the Netherlands: One, Tijn Smit, played keyboard on the Playcolt song, “Here Comes Maxi.”

From 1999 to 2007 Smit was represented by Roebling Hall in New York City.

1996

As a Manhattan teen, Smit was in a number of alt-rock bands. He studied abroad for a year at the Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam as an undergraduate at Parsons, and lived for a year in Berlin. He then entered the Master of Fine Arts program at Rutgers where he learned of the work of New York performance artist Michael Smith. He described to Vice magazine encountering Smith’s video, Go for It, Mike, that he felt it was “the saddest, most amazing celebration of averageness that’s ever been made. I saw that and realized this is what I want to do.” Smit graduated in 1996.

The subject of an ongoing performance and video series that started in 1996—Smit has said that he moved into video after growing terrified of performing live—Jonathan Grossmalerman, whose last name is pig-German for “big painter guy,” is a successful, alcoholic New York painter who has moved into low-end stand-up comedy. He has recorded an album, written a book, and delved into movie-making. (The latter is explained in Jonathan in Purgatory (1999) as a feature titled Sally which ends with David Salle dying during an operation for reconstructive plastic surgery.) Blake Gopnik the Washington Post has written that there are “hints of Andy Kaufman” in the work, saying, “Watch the videos with the sound turned off, and you’d sometimes swear you were watching real footage of someone with some kind of a career in comedy–no comic genius, maybe, but someone who’s got the timing and manner down.” In a performance shot in New York to look like Cologne, the character denounces Joseph Beuys, a national treasure in Germany. In another video, Jonathan Gets Clean (2000), the artist, in recovery, visits his Chelsea art dealer, played by real Chelsea art dealer John Post Lee who insists on paying his artists in cocaine then calls the police on him.

1989

A series of humorous takes on the memento mori, Mountain of Skulls emerged from frustration while Smit was waiting for post-production work on his Grossmalerman videos. The imagery harks back to the artist’s time on a school trip while at the Rietveld Academie, right after the 1989 Velvet Revolution, to the Sedlec Ossuary in Kutná Hora, in a part of Czechoslovakia that is now Slovakia. The skulls of those who died in the Black Death and 15th century Hussite Wars evoked for Smit the deaths of everyday people and whole towns wiped out by modern genocide. He decided to make a town’s worth of skulls with individual captions like “Infinitely Reasonable,” “Dull But Kind,” and “Total Dick,” creating an installation of 60 of the small gouache and watercolor paintings on paper for the Pulse Art Fair in Miami Beach. Online magazine Crave wrote that the series, painted in a range from constrained to loose, “stole the show.” Smit’s gallerist related that the work was “a mediation on vanitas, power, desire, and failure” and noted the installation’s popularity with selfie takers. Smit will present over 100 in the series for his forthcoming show at Charles James Gallery in Los Angeles.

1980

The series was released to Kickstarter funders, and then from April 17 on YouTube. It was re-released on November 11 on PasteMagazine.com every Wednesday on the Grossmalerman site through December 12. Paste magazine noted the dual sitcom, art-world-targeting nature of the work, saying “its free-wheeling absurdity comes off a bit like that beloved classic The Young Ones,” recalling the cult 1980s MTV classic.

This installation at Roebling Hall’s first Manhattan space (above Fanelli’s in SoHo) included three videos played on a screen in front of a bed with satin sheets. The videos are a “Zebra Countdown Video Klasse,” footage of live performances of three songs that, among other things, indicate the band’s fictitious level of international fame in a 1980s glam style. In the live performance of “Strange Sensation,” Maxi arrives late and attempts to express the meaning of the song to a troupe of modern dancers who act out the song’s love story. In the performance of “The Artist’s Lament,” Maxi-playing-Smit ends up covered in blood trying to make sense of the creative process. The bed in the installation is surrounded by Smit’s paintings of Maxi and his band.

1970

Guy Richards Smit (born 1970) is an American performance artist, painter, and singer-songwriter in the band Maxi Geil! & PlayColt. He has shown at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and in London, Los Angeles, Madrid, Valencia, Paris, Dublin, and Havana, among other places. He is represented by Charlie James Gallery in Los Angeles.

His name translating to “really horny” in German, Maxi Geil! is a New Wave pop star loosely based on 1970s and 1980s Dutch rock star Herman Brood. Smit writes and sings the songs for the band, Maxi Geil! & PlayColt, the music a variety of pop that blends influences from Bryan Ferry, Roxy Music, Los Angeles-based band Sparks and David Bowie from the Ziggy Stardust era. There seems to be less irony in the playing of this character than in Grossmalerman: Blake Gopnik of the Washington Post suggested this might be the artist’s truer alter ego whereas Roberta Smith of the New York Times detected a lessening of irony over time. William Powhida, writing in the Brooklyn Rail in 2004, read the fictional persona as representing “the underlying, uncensored desires and impulses of his audience.”

Jason Cacioppo, the cameraman on all the videos, used many camera moves of 1970s European cinema, like that of Rainer Werner Fassbinder where zooms and pans are used to squeeze as much pathos and meaning out of each scene. Smit painted portraits of each actor in costume after the video production in either watercolor or oil and hung them with the videos in the installation.

1825

Smit’s great-great-great grandfather on his mother’s side was Gulian Verplanck, who represented New York state in the United States Congress from 1825 to 1833 and later ran for mayor of New York in the city’s first open mayoral election. His maternal grandmother was a Billy Rose dancer.

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