Diana Schutz (Editor) Wiki, Biography, Age, Husband, Family, Net Worth

Diana Schutz Wiki,Biography, Net Worth

Diana Schutz is a Canadian-born comic book editor, serving as editor in chief of Comico during its peak years, followed by a 25-year tenure at Dark Horse Comics. Some of the best-known works she has edited are Frank Miller’s Sin City and 300, Matt Wagner’s Grendel, Stan Sakai’s Usagi Yojimbo, and Paul Chadwick’s Concrete. She was known to her letter-column readers as “Auntie Dydie”. She was an adjunct instructor of comics history and criticism at Portland Community College.

Explore Diana Schutz Wiki Age, Height, Biography as Wikipedia, Husband, Family relation. There is no question Diana Schutz is the most famous & most loved celebrity of all the time. You can find out how much net worth Diana has this year and how she spent her expenses. Also find out how she got rich at the age of 66. She has a pure loving kind heart personality. Scroll Down and find everything about her.

Diana Schutz Wiki, Biography

Date of Birth February 1, 1955
Birth Day February 1
Birth Years 1955
Age 66 years old
Birth Place Canada
Birth City
Birth Country United States of America
Nationality Canadian
Famous As Editor
Also Known for Editor
Zodiac Sign Aquarius
Occupation Editor

Famously known by the Family name Diana Schutz, is a great Editor. She was born on February 1, 1955, in Canada. is a beautiful and populous city located in Canada United States of America.

Diana Schutz Early Life Story, Family Background and Education

Diana Schutz was born on February 1, 1955 in Canada. She read comics as a child. By her early teens, she began drifting towards romance titles, and then away from comics altogether until college, where she studied philosophy and creative writing. Finding comics, including Steve Gerber’s Howard the Duck a welcome diversion from — if ultimately not a polar opposite to — “Plato, Bertrand Russell and Immanuel Kant,” she found herself pulled back into the world of comics. Frequenting the comic shop called “The ComicShop” (owned by Ken Witcher and Ron Norton) in Vancouver, British Columbia, she ultimately dropped out of graduate philosophy (with an undergraduate degree in creative writing) to move (in 1978) from being one of the ComicShop’s few female customers to being one of its few “counter people,” where she says she found herself “learn[ing] social skills I never learned in the ivory tower of academia.”

Witcher, Norton, and The ComicShop swiftly proved able sources for Schutz to discover comics, including “Barry Windsor-Smith’s Conan; Jim Starlin’s Captain Marvel; Craig Russell’s Killraven; and Dave Sim’s Cerebus, of which she was “one of the first 2,000 readers to actually buy issue 1.”

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Diana Schutz Net Worth

Diana Schutz has a net worth of $5.00 million (Estimated) which she earned from her occupation as Editor. Popularly known as the Editor of United States of America. She is seen as one of the most successful Editor of all times. Diana Schutz Net Worth & Basic source of earning is being a successful Canadian Editor.

Diana entered the career as Editor In her early life after completing her formal education..

Net Worth

Estimated Net Worth in 2022 $1 Million to $5 Million Approx
Previous Year’s Net Worth (2021) Being Updated
Salary in 2021 Not Available
Annual Salary Being Updated
Cars Info Not Available
Income Source Editor

Diana Schutz Personal Life, Relationships and Dating

Schutz was married to Bob Schreck (now divorced), and lives in Portland, Oregon, as does some of her family (including her sister Barbara, who is married to Grendel-creator Matt Wagner).

Social Network

Born on February 1, 1955, the Editor Diana Schutz is arguably the world’s most influential social media star. Diana is an ideal celebrity influencer. With her large number of social media fans, she often posts many personal photos and videos to interact with her huge fan base on social media platforms. Personal touch and engage with her followers. You can scroll down for information about her Social media profiles.

Social Media Profiles and Accounts

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Life Story & Timeline

2015

Schutz announced her retirement from Dark Horse in March 2015.

2014

In addition to meeting and mingling with publishers, distributors, promotion teams and all manner of creators, Schutz started freelance work for “various other fan publications”, including Comics Buyer’s Guide, The Comics Journal, Amazing Heroes and Comics Scene, from which she graduated to a very brief — four-day — job with Marvel Comics as an assistant editor.

In addition to editing multiple books which have received Eisner and Harvey Awards, she has edited a handful of titles which have won the Eisner Award for “Best Anthology” — award-winning anthologies are often seen as the de facto ‘editor’s award’ since their success depends far more on the editor than do other comics. She also — with artist Tim Sale — won the 2006 Haxtur Award for the Planeta deAgostini Spanish translation of their short story “Young Love” from Solo #1.

2006

She has won an Inkpot Award and the 2006 Friends of Lulu Award for Women of Distinction, and was also nominated in the (long-discontinued) Eisner “Best Editor” category in 1992, 1994, and 1995 for her work on a range of titles.

2001

Having been one of the small core of readers who bought the first issue of Dave Sim’s Cerebus, Schutz got to know the man himself, and began working for him as a proofreader, first unofficially, and then officially from the “middle of ’94” until early 2001. She explains that she “never proofed the book itself,” “[j]ust the text, the typeset text” feeling that her respect for his abilities outweighed any potential “qualms” about the book’s often-contentious content.

Schutz’s stated stance (which has largely held sway throughout her entire editorial career) is that her role is not to interfere with an artist’s story, merely to make sure that their work is “as grammatically clear as it could be.” This she did for Sim for several years, balking only when Sim sent her a “boxing challenge to proofread” which she felt was a personal attack on a friend (and one introduced to her by Sim himself). Schutz promptly resigned in January 2001, and Sim even published her resignation letter in Cerebus #265. This issue also included a “20-page anti-female diatribe,” and Schutz remains mildly aggravated over this juxtaposition, since she thinks some readers might equate the two—she did not, and found herself having to explain that she had no problem proofreading “an argument, no matter how faulty, in which Dave believes,” no matter her personal views, and that she had resigned over the boxing challenge itself from the previous issue, #264. Indeed, even while Schutz was performing proofreading duties, she did so via fax, and had very little—if any—personal contact with Sim himself.

1999

In July 1999, Schutz instigated the Maverick imprint at Dark Horse Comics which was designed as an umbrella title for a number of creator-owned titles, including some already published by Dark Horse and some new to the publisher. The ‘Maverick’ name was designed “to provide a kind of identity or specific line for those sorts of individual creator visions.” The aim of the “Maverick” line was to “push the medium a little bit,” although Schutz recognized that such titles are often a hard sell. To help address this, the Maverick Annual anthologies (published from 2000 as Dark Horse Maverick and later under such subtitles as Happy Endings and AutobioGraphix) placed newer creators (Farel Dalrymple, Gilbert Austin, Jason Hall, Matt Kindt) alongside the more established names of Frank Miller and Sam Kieth.

1994

Concurrent with her move to Oregon, Schutz returned to graduate studies, and in 1994 she received a Master of Arts degree in Communication Studies from the University of Portland, writing her M.A. thesis on female cartoonists Julie Doucet, Roberta Gregory, and Aline Kominsky-Crumb.

During its second year, Schutz highlighted Maverick’s “trades program” as standing out, both for collecting previously published materials, including Neil Gaiman and Alice Cooper’s The Last Temptation (initially released in 1994 by Marvel Music), and debuting new work, including titles by such legendary individuals as Will Eisner. Somewhat ahead of its time, the imprint would contend with the “financial obstacles” that go hand-in-hand, said Schutz in 2001, with the then-declining numbers of people reading comics, but she maintained that:

1990

By 1990, Schutz began work for Dark Horse Comics, rising (by 2007) to the position of Executive Editor, having variously held the roles of Senior Editor, Managing Editor, and Editor-in-Chief. In December 2001, she was the fifth-most-senior staff member in terms of length-of-employment (after, respectively, Mike Richardson, Randy Stradley, Neil Hankerson and Cary Grazzini), but stated that she had originally relinquished the job of Editor-in-Chief in December 1995, after almost two years, “because what it did is it put me in meetings all the damn time, writing memos and holding people’s hands and I wasn’t able to make good comics anymore”.

1985

Recommended by friend Chris Claremont, Schutz was to be (at age 29) Ann Nocenti’s assistant editor on the X-Men, but found herself entering her new job with “unrealistic expectations”; ultimately handing in her notice after a mere four days. Several months later (in 1985), she (and Bob Schreck) began work at Comico, which “with its opportunities for creator ownership, and the fact that it was much smaller and more personable, was much more [her] style”. Schutz’s first comic book editing credit was Robotech: The Macross Saga #3. Having picked up in her brief tenure at Marvel some knowledge “from Virginia Romita how to create and enforce production schedules”, Schutz took over as Comico’s primary editor. (Schreck oversaw “all the marketing and publishing type aspects”.)

1981

Schutz worked in comics stores for six years, moving from Vancouver to California and from The ComicShop to Comics and Comix in 1981. By 1982, she was making the move from retail towards publishing by means of a “bimonthly, 32-page newsletter that [she] put together for Comics & Comix entitled The Telegraph Wire which was modeled on The Comics Journal (each issue containing an interview, reviews, news and adverts), and its production swiftly became her role at C&C.

1955

Diana Schutz (born February 1, 1955) is a Canadian-born comic book editor, serving as editor in chief of Comico during its peak years, followed by a 25-year tenure at Dark Horse Comics. Some of the best-known works she has edited are Frank Miller’s Sin City and 300, Matt Wagner’s Grendel, Stan Sakai’s Usagi Yojimbo, and Paul Chadwick’s Concrete. She was known to her letter-column readers as “Auntie Dydie”. She is an adjunct instructor of comics history and criticism at Portland Community College.

Diana Schutz was born on February 1, 1955 in Canada. She read comics as a child. By her early teens, she began drifting towards romance titles, and then away from comics altogether until college, where she studied philosophy and creative writing. Finding comics, including Steve Gerber’s Howard the Duck a welcome diversion from — if ultimately not a polar opposite to — “Plato, Bertrand Russell and Immanuel Kant,” she found herself pulled back into the world of comics. Frequenting the comic shop called “The ComicShop” (owned by Ken Witcher and Ron Norton) in Vancouver, British Columbia, she ultimately dropped out of graduate philosophy (with an undergraduate degree in creative writing) to move (in 1978) from being one of the ComicShop’s few female customers to being one of its few “counter people,” where she says she found herself “learn[ing] social skills I never learned in the ivory tower of academia.”