U Gambira (Dissident Monk) Wiki, Biography, Age, Wife, Family, Net Worth

U Gambira Wiki,Biography, Net Worth

U Gambira is a former Buddhist monk, activist and a leader of the All-Burma Monks’ Alliance, a group which helped lead the 2007 protests against Burma’s military government. Following the protests, he went into hiding and published two editorials critical of the Burmese government in the Washington Post and The Guardian on 4 November 2007. He was arrested the same day.

Explore U Gambira Wiki Age, Height, Biography as Wikipedia, Wife, Family relation. There is no question U Gambira is the most famous & most loved celebrity of all the time. You can find out how much net worth U has this year and how he spent his expenses. Also find out how he got rich at the age of 42. He has a pure loving kind heart personality. Scroll Down and find everything about him.

U Gambira Wiki, Biography

Date of Birth 19 June 1979
Birth Day 19 June
Birth Years 1979
Age 42 years old
Birth Place Pauk Township, Magway Division, Burma
Birth City Magway Division
Birth Country Myanmar
Nationality Burmese
Famous As Monk
Also Known for Monk
Zodiac Sign Gemini
Occupation Monk

Famously known by the Family name Nyi Nyi Lwin, is a great Monk. He was born on 19 June 1979, in Pauk Township, Magway Division, Burma

. Magway Division is a beautiful and populous city located in Pauk Township, Magway Division, Burma

Myanmar.

U Gambira Early Life Story, Family Background and Education

Gambira started attending school at age five, but the 1988 pro-democracy protests caused school closings that interrupted Gambira’s schooling. According to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP), he ran away from home at age 12 and was recruited as a child soldier by a military unit in Yangon. Once his brother and his friend located him, they removed him from the unit and returned with him to their home in Pauk Township. When the authorities came to investigate, Gambira’s parents enrolled him in a local monastery to protect him from arrest or conscription into further military service.

Read Also: Jeremy Gan Wiki, Biography, Age, Net Worth, Family, Instagram, Twitter, Social Profiles & More Facts

Nyi Nyi Lwin Net Worth

Nyi Nyi Lwin has a net worth of $5.00 million (Estimated) which he earned from his occupation as Monk. Popularly known as the Monk of Myanmar. He is seen as one of the most successful Monk of all times. Nyi Nyi Lwin Net Worth & Basic source of earning is being a successful Burmese Monk.

U entered the career as Monk In his early life after completing his formal education..

Net Worth

Estimated Net Worth in 2022 $1 Million to $5 Million Approx
Previous Year’s Net Worth (2021) Being Updated
Salary in 2021 Not Available
Annual Salary Being Updated
Cars Info Not Available
Income Source Monk

U Gambira Personal Life, Relationships and Dating

Gambira, who is no longer a monk, has been living in Thailand after being re-arrested several times in 2012, and married to Marie Siochana since 2013, an Australian citizen. On 8 March 2019 he was granted asylum in Australia.

Social Network

Born on 19 June 1979, the Monk U Gambira is arguably the world’s most influential social media star. U is an ideal celebrity influencer. With his large number of social media fans, he often posts many personal photos and videos to interact with his huge fan base on social media platforms. Personal touch and engage with his followers. You can scroll down for information about his Social media profiles.

Social Media Profiles and Accounts

Twitter Not Available
Instagram Not Available
Facebook Not Available
Wikipedia U Gambira Wikipedia
YouTube Not Available
Spotify Not Available
Website Not Available
Itunes Not Available
Pandora Not Available
Googleplay Not Available
Deezer Not Available
Quora Not Available
Soundcloud Not Available

Life Story & Timeline

2019

Gambira, who is no longer a monk, has been living in Thailand after being re-arrested several times in 2012, and married to Marie Siochana since 2013, an Australian citizen. On 8 March 2019 he was granted asylum in Australia.

2016

On 19 January 2016, he was arrested in Mandalay on a politically motivated charge of illegal border crossing. He was sentenced without evidence to 6 months in prison. The Human Rights Council Working Group on Arbitrary Detention said that the deprivation of liberty of Gambira was arbitrary, being in contravention with Articles 10 and 13 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; it falls within category II of the categories applicable to the consideration of the cases submitted to the Working Group. He was released on 1 July 2016.

2012

Gambira was released during a mass pardon of prisoners on 13 January 2012 as part of the 2011–2012 Burmese political reforms. He ceased to be a monk in April 2012, stating that he had been unable to find a monastery to join due to his status as a former prisoner. He was re-arrested at least three times in 2012.

On 13 January 2012, Gambira was released in a mass presidential pardon of political prisoners that also included 88 Generation activists Min Ko Naing, Htay Kywe, and Nilar Thein, as well as Shan leader Khun Htun Oo. Gambira stated in an interview that his imprisonment had left him with depression, frequent headaches, and failing memory; however, he said he had difficulty finding a doctor willing to treat him, for fear that it would draw government reprisals. He attempted to leave the country for treatment, but could not get the necessary paperwork. Gambira told reporters that his organisation would continue to boycott the government despite the amnesty: “The government has transformed its external appearance into a civilian one but their efforts to implement democracy are still rather weak, while many cases of human rights violations continue”.

On 6 March 2012, he was once again detained and interrogated over a recent visit he had made to Kachin State, where local ethnic minority groups were engaged in guerrilla warfare against the government. He was released two days later. The following month, he was forced to formally cease to be a monk after several monasteries refused him membership, which he said was due to their fear of government reprisals if they were to allow him to enter. He then returned to his birth name of Nyi Nyi Lwin.

In November 2012, Gambira was seated in the front row for a speech by visiting US President Barack Obama, who cautiously praised seeming democratic reforms including the release of political prisoners like Gambira. A few weeks after the speech, authorities arrested Gambira again and sent him to Insein prison. The US Embassy released a statement on the arrest, saying, “We’re monitoring reports of U Gambira’s detention. We urged the government of Burma to be fully transparent and follow due process of law”. Gambira’s family believed that he had been arrested to prevent him from joining protests by a group of monks against a copper mining project. On 11 December, Gambira was released on a bail of 4 million kyat (US$4,686).

2011

Gambira was transferred to a labour camp in Sagaing Region. When his mother visited him in early 2009, she reported that he was on hunger strike, refusing to eat in protest of the conditions of his confinement. Amnesty International reported that he suffered from nervous tension and was in generally ill health. On 31 October 2011, the organisation issued an “urgent action” identifying Gambira as a prisoner of conscience and stating that he was being denied hospitalisation necessary to treat complications from being tortured at Hkamti prison in April 2009. Democratic Voice of Burma reported that Gambira was being regularly beaten by guards during the same period and was having seizures as a result.

2009

In November, Gambira was sentenced to 68 years in prison, at least 12 years of which would be hard labour. In early 2009, five years were taken off his total sentence, reducing it to 63 years. Both Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International protested his sentence, calling for his immediate release. Aung Ko Ko Lwin, Gambira’s brother who had sheltered him from authorities, was sentenced to twenty years in prison, and Moe Htet Hlyan, Gambira’s brother-in-law, was also imprisoned. Aung Ko Ko Lwin and Moe Htet Hlyan were sent to Arakan State and Mon State, respectively, to serve their sentences.

2008

In October 2008, he was sentenced to 68 years in prison, including 12 years hard labour; the sentence was reduced to 65 years on appeal. Gambira reportedly protested his imprisonment by organising chanting with other imprisoned monks, boycotting his trial, and going on hunger strike. Human rights groups including Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch also protested his imprisonment.

In April 2008, Gambira’s sister reported that he was leading a mettā chanting campaign among other imprisoned monks of Insein Prison to protest against their being issued “layperson” identification cards for the upcoming constitutional referendum. He was subsequently placed in solitary confinement. In speaking later of conditions in the prison, Gambira stated that he had malaria for seven of his eight months there. Tomas Ojea Quintana, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Human Rights for Burma, visited Gambira and four other political prisoners at Insein in August.

Gambira faced a total of sixteen charges for his role in the protests, including membership in an unlawful association and illegal movement across borders. In October 2008, Gambira’s lawyer, Aung Thein, resigned from his case, saying that the military government would not allow him the materials to prepare an adequate defence. On one occasion, Gambira refused to appear in court himself, stating that the trial of a forcibly disrobed monk was disrespectful to Buddhism.

During his imprisonment, Gambira won the Bindmans Law and Campaigning Award in absentia at the 2008 Index on Censorship Freedom of Expression Awards. The prize recognises “lawyers and campaigners who have fought repression or who have struggled to change political climates and perceptions, especially those who have used or established legal means to fight injustice in the field of freedom of expression”, and is sponsored by Bindmans LLP. Also in 2008, the official website of Morbegno, Italy announced that Gambira had been made an honorary citizen of the town.

2007

Gambira first became well known in August 2007 during widespread protests against the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC), the military government which had ruled the country since suppressing the previous uprising in 1988. The protests were sparked when the SPDC cut fuel subsidies without warning, causing fuel and other commodity prices to suddenly rise.

On 24 September 2007, the All-Burma Monks’ Alliance released a statement condemning the military government: “In order to banish the common enemy evil regime from Burmese soil forever, united masses of people need to join hands with the united clergy forces … We pronounce the evil military despotism, which is impoverishing and pauperizing our people of all walks, including the clergy, as the common enemy of all our citizens.” During the demonstrations, Gambira split his time between Mandalay and Yangon, moving between the two cities to avoid arrest.

2003

The city’s Buddhist monks took on a leadership role in these demonstrations, forming the All-Burma Monks’ Alliance and lending the uprising its nickname of “the Saffron Revolution”, after the colour of the monks’ robes. Gambira, then a 29-year-old monk, became one of the new organisation’s leaders. He later stated that the monks had been planning an uprising since 2003 or 2004. Because monks are revered in Burma’s Buddhist-majority society, the government at first appeared reluctant to suppress their demonstrations.

1988

Gambira started attending school at age five, but the 1988 pro-democracy protests caused school closings that interrupted Gambira’s schooling. According to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP), he ran away from home at age 12 and was recruited as a child soldier by a military unit in Yangon. Once his brother and his friend located him, they removed him from the unit and returned with him to their home in Pauk Township. When the authorities came to investigate, Gambira’s parents enrolled him in a local monastery to protect him from arrest or conscription into further military service.

1979

U Gambira (Burmese: ရှင်ဂမ္ဘီရ ; born 19 June 1979) is a former Buddhist monk, activist and a leader of the All-Burma Monks’ Alliance, a group which helped lead the 2007 protests against Burma’s military government. Following the protests, he went into hiding and published two editorials critical of the Burmese government in the Washington Post and The Guardian on 4 November 2007. He was arrested the same day.